Merve Emre on Benjamin Moser and Susan Sontag

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In The Atlantic, Merve Emre takes issue with Benjamin Moser’s new official biography of Susan Sontag, and particularly Moser’s distinction between Sontag’s private and public selves.

 

Sandra Newman on Toni Morrison

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In a Washington Post op-ed, Sandra Newman takes issue with the misattribution of platitudes to Toni Morrison in the wake of the author’s death.

 

Anthony Uhlmann on Wayne Macauley

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At the Sydney Review of Books, Anthony Uhlmann tries to pin down the inner workings and moral purposes of Wayne Macauley’s Simpson Returns.

 

J.H. Holt on Patrick Langley

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J.H. Holt zeroes in on how the depersonalised, staccato language of Patrick Langley’s Arkady conjures the textures of contemporary London, in a new review at Full Stop.

 

Jonathan McAloon on Mathias Énard

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In a review of Mathias Énard’s Tell Them of Battles, Kings, and Elephants, Jonathan McAloon uses the novel’s publication as an occasion to look back at the author’s work to date.

 

Dustin Illingworth on Ingeborg Bachmann

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Writing for The Nation, Dustin Illingworth celebrates Malina, by the Austrian experimental novelist Ingeborg Bachmann, recently translated into English by Philip Boehm.

 

Jon Doyle on Ruby Cowling

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At Review 31, Jon Doyle reads Ruby Cowling’s short story collection This Paradise and tries to put his finger on Cowling’s aesthetic tendencies.

 

Rohan Maitzen on Virginia Woolf

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At her blog, Novel Readings, Rohan Maitzen has been taking a deep dive into the works of Virginia Woolf, most recently focusing on the “interesting failure” of Woolf’s final novel, The Years.

 

Jacqueline Leung on Yoko Tawada

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Jacqueline Leung takes a close look at Yoko Tawada’s dystopian novel The Emissary, translated by Margaret Mitsutani, and focuses on the ways in which a narrative about prolonged lifespans for elderly people allows Tawada to twist the Japanese language.

 

Daniel Marc Janes on Jean-Baptiste del Amo

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At 3 AM Magazine, Daniel Marc James tunes into the individual notes of the “nasal symphony” — a symphony of smells — in Jean-Baptiste del Amo’s Animalia, translated by Frank Wynne.