Anna Leszkiewicz on Irish Essayists

Categories: Best of the Web
by
 

In the latest issue of the New Statesman, Anna Leszkiewicz surveys the boom in collections of personal essays by emerging writers in Ireland.

 

Ashley Kalagian Blunt on Fiona Wright

Categories: Best of the Web
by
 

At the Sydney Review of Books, Ashley Kalagian Blunt reviews Fiona Wright’s new essay collection, The World Was Whole, with an eye towards Wright’s manipulation of the conventional essay form.

 

Mary Pappalardo on Agustín Fernández Mallo

Categories: Best of the Web
by
 

Agustín Fernández Mallo’s Nocilla Trilogy, translated by Thomas Bunstead, has recently been published in its entirety in the United States. In an essay at Full Stop, Mary Pappalardo has used the occasion to survey the scope of Mallo’s aesthetic project.

 

Kyle Callert on Gabriela Ybarra

Categories: Best of the Web
by
 

At 3 AM Magazine, Kyle Callert traces the line between truth and imagination — and, more problematically, the line between truth and the reconstruction of truth — in Gabriela Ybarra’s The Dinner Guest, translated by Natasha Wimmer.

 

Valeria Luiselli on Guadalupe Nettel

Categories: Best of the Web
by
 

In a new essay at Guernica, translated by Samuel Rutter, Valeria Luiselli calls attention to the novels of the Mexican writer Guadalupe Nettel, particularly her prize-winning After the Winter.

 

GD Dess on Elisa Gabbert

Categories: Best of the Web
by
 

GD Dess reviews Elisa Gabbert’s essay collection The Word Pretty in the Los Angeles Review of Books, viewing the book with a jaundiced eye and using it as an occasion to consider the troubled aesthetics of the “lyrical essay”.

 

Lauren Elkin on Susan Sontag

Categories: Best of the Web
by
 

Lauren Elkin sings the praises of Susan Sontag, in a new essay at Aeon that characterises Sontag as an “art monster” of unflagging commitment to her intellectual craft.

 

Ed Simon on Samuel Madden

Categories: Best of the Web
by
 

At Berfrois, Ed Simon shines light on Samuel Madden’s Memoirs of the Twentieth Century, first published in 1733, and Madden’s legacy as a writer of Swiftian “novel prognostications”.