Katy Waldman on James Lasdun

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At the New Yorker, Katy Waldman sees traces of autofiction in James Lasdun’s new novel, Afternoon of a Faun, which presents itself as social realism blended with elements of a thriller.

 

Becky Varley-Winter on Jean Frémon and Annie Ernaux

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Earlier this week at the Glasgow Review of Books, Becky Varley-Winter read Jean Frémon’s Now, Now, Louison (trans. Cole Swenson) and Annie Ernaux’s The Years (trans. Alison L. Strayer) side-by-side, as books composed of “layers of stories”.

 

Katharine Coldiron on Millennial Novelists

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Recently, in the Washington Post, Mark Athitakis lamented the absence of a millennial novelist who could claim to be a household name. Today, at Book & Film Globe, Katharine Coldiron explains why there will never be one.

 

Will Preston on Pola Oloixarac

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At Full Stop, Will Preston reviews Dark Constellations, a strange new novel by the Argentinian writer Pola Oloixarac (trans. Roy Kesey), which blurs the lines between different biological forms.

 

Politics

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David killed the Queen. It was nothing personal, he said. It was just politics. All he wanted was to make a political statement about the abuse of power in the country.

 

Blair Johnson on Ian Maleney

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Writing for Full Stop, Blair Johnson attempts to pin down the place and function of silence in Ian Maleney’s Minor Monuments.

 

Ange Mlinko on Diane Williams

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At the London Review of Books, Ange Mlinko puts her finger on the artistic sophistication of the short stories of Diane Williams.

 

Abhrajyoti Chakraborty on Yuko Tsushima

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At the New Yorker, Abhrajyoti Chakraborty argues for recognition of Yuko Tsushima’s Territory of Light (trans. Geraldine Harcourt) as an example of indirect autofiction.

 

Nathan Goldman on Sally Rooney

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Resonating with Madeleine Schwartz’s remarks on the politics of Sally Rooney, Nathan Goldman writes about the politics of Rooney’s conservative aesthetics in the Baffler.